5 Reasons To Go To Church This Sunday

I’ll be honest: coffee is always the first thing.  The alarm goes off, or my husband rubs my arm, or the dog licks my face, or my eyes flutter open, and I immediately stumble into the kitchen, toward the coffee pot.  

I watch the coffee brew.  I pour in the skim milk.  I stir in a bit of brown sugar.  I breathe in that beautiful, bitter scent, and I take that first, sweet sip.

5 Reasons To Go To Church This Sunday

This is the beginning of my Sunday morning.  Maroon 5 may have said it best, “things just get so crazy” and “living life gets hard to do,” but there is something subtly sacred about Sunday mornings.

Once the caffeine hits my bloodstream, I start moving through the other motions.  Eating my breakfast.  Taking my vitamins.  Showering.  Staring at my closet.  Doing my makeup.  Searching for my car keys.  Crating the pup.  Setting the alarm.  Driving to church.  I do it all with the coffee cup in my left hand.  I take the last sip as my husband parallel parks the car.

I’ll be honest: I almost always go to church on Sunday mornings.  And, I almost never want to go on Sunday mornings.  I don’t want to go anywhere on Sunday mornings.  I want to sit in bed with my coffee and a book.  But, I go to church anyway.  I usually go sleepy-eyed.  I rarely go bushy-tailed.

5 Reasons To Go To Church This Sunday_1Which begs the question: why go to church at all?  If you’re reading your Bible…  If you’re saying your prayers…  If you’re trying to be a good family member or co-worker…  If you’re attending a small group…  If you’re doing all those other spiritual practices throughout the week… Why go to church as well?

1.God is there.

God is everywhere, but He reveals Himself in a unique way in the community and in the liturgy.  A dear (brilliant) friend once said, if you’re trying to hear the voice of God in your life, why would you avoid the one place where He is most present.  In the community of believers.  In the Word.  In the Eucharist.  Jesus says it best in the Book of Matthew: “For where two or three are gathered in my name, I am there among them” (18:20, NRSV).

2. God wants you there.

Or, in other words, “because the Bible says so.”  As Paul wrote to the Hebrews, “let us consider how to provoke one another to love and good deeds, not neglecting to meet together, as is the habit of some, but encouraging one another” (10:24-25, NRSV).  It is not easy being a Christian; it is a demanding call.  We need a community of like-minded believers to encourage us, challenge us, and hold us accountable.

3. Your neighbor needs you there.

I once skipped church to read Harry Potter.  It was the second to last book, and I was just beginning to understand horcruxes, and I could not step away.  So, I put my will, my wants first.  Over God’s.  Over my neighbor’s.  

As stated above, we all need a community to encourage and challenge us.  Just because you don’t want to go to church on a particular day doesn’t mean your neighbor doesn’t desperately need you at church on a particular day.  You owe it to your neighbor to put down the book and go to church.

4. You don’t know everything.

It is just true.  You don’t know everything.  I don’t know everything, either.  I went to seminary for three years full-time, and I barely learned the basics.  The Bible is the Word of God.  There is simply no way you – or I or even your pastor – could make sense of it alone.  By studying the Word in community, we avoid manipulating it according to our own (often subconscious) desires or fears.

5. Jesus did know everything… and he still worshipped in community.

Jesus is the Savior of the world, the Son of God, and he was always at the synagogue. Even he saw value in studying, worshipping, and praying with others.  His community was imperfect, and he frequently criticized both the institution and the members, but he went anyway.  There are worse examples to follow.

So, come Saturday night, get your coffee cup ready.  And, come Sunday morning, get showered, get dressed, and get to church.  Adam Levine was right.  “Things just get so crazy” and “living life gets hard to do.”  That’s not a reason to stay in bed next Sunday morning.  That’s the best reason to go to church next Sunday morning.

Why The Perfect Time To Pray Is When You Don’t Want To Pray

It’s 6:30 in the morning in March in Virginia, so the sky is still black and the air still crisp as we drive.  We park in the vast, empty lot before the big, dark church, and we walk into the warm, yellow light of the chapel.  About 20 or so teenagers are already seated, but everyone is silent and still.  A few minutes pass before Father Mark enters with Mrs. Moreau, the petite French woman who wears a black lace veil over her hair and speaks with a thick accent.  She holds the golden Book of Gospels high above her head and processes, with the priest, down the center aisle toward the altar.  It is 6:30 in the morning in March in Virginia and 15-year-old me is here to worship.

Why the Perfect Time to Pray_1Growing up, my church celebrated these early morning Masses each Wednesday during Lent and Advent.  I dreaded it each Tuesday night as I set my alarm.  I regretted it each Wednesday morning as I showered while the rest of my family slept.  I loved it, however, the second we pulled into the parking lot and saw the light spilling from that one room in the otherwise dark church.  Even at age 15, I sensed that something special was happening in that chapel before the sun came up.  

The Mass always ran swiftly.  Given the hour, my usual anxious thoughts weren’t awake yet, and every word and movement of the liturgy amazed me.  Isaiah’s poetry and Paul’s arguments.  Mrs. Moreau’s deep bow before the altar.  The splash of red wine as the priest filled the golden chalice.  The echo of young voices praying to “our Father, who art in heaven.”  The feel of my friends’ hands, some soft and some sharp, as we offered peace. Then, finally, the priest’s long arms drawing the sign of the cross over us and his deep voice telling us to “go in peace to love and serve the Lord.”

At the time, I assumed our church leaders were teaching us some legalistic lesson about the importance of Mass attendance.

Now, some 15 years later, I know different.  

They were telling us:

This is where you come.  

This is to whom you come.

In the middle of the night, when you can’t see the way forward, when you’re anxious for the sun to rise, desperate for the Son to rise.

You come to God.

The youth minister, the priest, and even Mrs. Moreau knew that we would all, with time, experience the darkness and the ugliness of the world.  They knew that, in those moments, we would desire the light and beauty of the divine.  They knew that we would need God, and we would need to know how to reach Him.

So, they invited us and encouraged us to come together in prayer, even on a weekday, even before 7 in the morning.  And, now, I extend the same invitation to you.  

I invite you to pray, even when you don’t want to, especially when you don’t want to.  

Because, if we practice communing with God on our good days, it is a lot easier to commune with Him on our bad days.  

We’ll know where to search for Him.  We’ll know by which name to call Him.  We’ll know how to recognize the sound of His voice, the signs of His presence.

I have not seen Father Mark or Mrs. Moreau in well over a decade, but I recall and appreciate them each Lent.  Since high school, I have had several moments full of pre-dawn darkness and, thanks to them, I knew how to reach for God.  

It doesn’t often involve driving to church before 7 in the morning.  But it does involve whispering the Lord’s name, opening the Word, taking the Eucharist, sitting in sacred silence, and accepting peace from my neighbor.    

To be fair, there was never a Wednesday morning in high school when I leapt out of bed, eager to leave the comfort of my own house to rush to church.  There was also never a Wednesday morning that I left the chapel feeling less of the Lord’s joy and peace.  And, there has never been a day since that I longed for the Lord and could not locate Him. 

 

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